Sight Word List
Words That Give Reading Power


 Children in their first years at school, who learn the sight word list below, will have an excellent start to reading and writing.

Initially this process takes time, often months. That's why teachers introduce lists like this to children, gradually, when they first start school. But it doesn't hurt them to recognise a few words before then, if they are ready to learn them.



Sight Word List

The list of sight words below is broken into groups.  Each group consists of 10 words.

There are several lists available for teachers to use. But they are virtually identical as they are composed of words children most frequently use. 

The list below covers 80 of the first sight words your child will need to know.

The trick is to ensure your child recognises the words in one group before starting another. But as I mentioned before, this doesn't happen immediately. So don't feel you need to put pressure on your child or you'll switch off their desire to learn. If you're helping them at home, keep it light.

At the end of this article I will explain how you can gently introduce some of these words to your child so they learn them without pressure.

Don't be concerned if your child finds the list below too difficult at this stage. They may only manage the first group of words. Or they may not be  ready for them at all. If that's the case, wait for their teacher to guide you.




 One


I

am

are

can

is

go

he

my

see

the


 Two


and

Mum

of

look

said

for

to

in

you

me


 Three


come

like

boy

little

this

play

big

have

me

saw


 Four


run

Dad

down

good

here

you

on

was

red

blue


Five


her

out

she

why

yes

into

when

will

with

down

Six


green

man

one

do

home

out

get

black

going

after

Seven


after

girl

had

stop

two

brown

did

be

who

make

Eight


mother

school

over

under

know

walk

again

could

first

put



More About Sight Words

 Your child needs to learn these word by sight rather than decode them. That means they may need to see them many, many times in order to memorise them.

You may be asking yourself about now

  •  what exactly is a sight word?
  •  why are they so important in reading?
  •  how do you know what is a sight word and when do you sound out a word? 

If you want to know more, click on my article What Are Sight Words? There you'll get answers you need. At the same time you'll see how it's affected an adult student of mine who hasn't ever known them!



Introducing Them To Your Child

Here's a great way to introduce sight words.

  • Print off two copies of the sight word list.
  • Cut two copies of the group One words starting the word 'I'.
  • Cut each of the words individually.
  • Place one set of the words in front of your child. You keep the other.
  • Hold up one of the words
  •  Read it to your child and ask them to find the matching word. (They will study the shape of the letters and hear the word associated with them.)
  • When they find the matching word, repeat the word. Say: "Yes, that word says ......  Can you tell me what the word says?" (This reinforces and matches in their brain the visual appearance of the word with how the word sounds.)

Play this game often and you'll find your child will become increasingly comfortable with these words. Gradually they will memorise them. They will then build up an invaluable bank of everyday words for reading and writing.


If you are struggling to engage your child, click on my phonics games page. There you'll find out how important it is to make learning fun. Plus great activities you can do at home to breathe life into learning literacy skills.



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