First Grade Sight Words
Get a Head Start


It is vital to be able to instantly recognise and write first grade sight words in the first year of school. That is the year when children, aged 5 or 6, are expected to start reading sentences and write simple statements.


As a parent, it’s prudent to be alert and aware of what is being taught in this grade. If you understand what your child is learning and why, they’ll get off to a great start.

Below is a list of the 41 words your child will be expected to learn during these important 12 months.


List of  First Grade Sight Words

after

again

an

any

as

ask

by

could

every

fly

from

give

going

had

has

her

him

him

how

just

know

let

live

may

of

old

once

open

over

put

round

some

stop

some

stop

take

thank

them

then

think

walk

were

when




When a teacher sends home a list of these first grade sight words, start immediately.

Children don’t automatically swim when they get in water. They need to be taught.  And it’s the same with reading.  It doesn’t come naturally because the brain isn’t designed that way.

While some words can be sounded out, the words above have to be learned. First they need to be recognised then they can (with lots of practise) be written.


If you aren’t familiar with the importance of sight words, you’ll get all the information you need on my page, What Are Sight Words.

As a literacy teacher, I strongly urge you to start early and be consistent in helping your child acquire these words. Then they'll be capable of recognising and writing many of the basic words they use in conversation.

The words should be learned a few at a time. Your child’s teacher will send them home in small manageable lists.

The more children are exposed to these words the more likely they are to commit them to memory. The trick is to make it fun.

Here are some tips for teaching sight words

  • Place individual words around the house eg one on the mirror in the bathroom, one on the bedroom door. Put one on the fridge door and tell your child that if they want something from the fridge they have to try to say the word first.
  • Get your child to trace around the shape of each word and notice which letters are tall, which short.
  • Hide them around the room. Children love finding things.
  • Show them how to write them in steam in the shower.
  • Write them with chalk pens on windows and glass doors.
  • Write them in the sand at the beach and ask your child to try to read them.

These lists of words will become an essential part of your child’s reading and writing tool kit. Ensure they know them and you'll be delighted at how much it improves their ability to read and express themselves on paper.


Go From First Grade Sight Words To Literacy Lessons


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